Linux Cookbook [Electronic resources] نسخه متنی

اینجــــا یک کتابخانه دیجیتالی است

با بیش از 100000 منبع الکترونیکی رایگان به زبان فارسی ، عربی و انگلیسی

Linux Cookbook [Electronic resources] - نسخه متنی

Carla Schroder

نمايش فراداده ، افزودن یک نقد و بررسی
افزودن به کتابخانه شخصی
ارسال به دوستان
جستجو در متن کتاب
بیشتر
تنظیمات قلم

فونت

اندازه قلم

+ - پیش فرض

حالت نمایش

روز نیمروز شب
جستجو در لغت نامه
بیشتر
لیست موضوعات
افزودن یادداشت
افزودن یادداشت جدید







3.1. Introduction


Debian
is known for being extremely stable and reliable, and for its
excellent package manager/dependency resolver,
apt. Installing a new application is this
simple:

# apt-get programname

All dependencies will be automatically fetched and installed. Not
only is apt a sophisticated, intelligent tool,
but the official Debian software repositories maintain strict
packaging standards. The official Debian repositories contain over
12,000 programs, more than any other platform.

dpkg is RPM's Debian
cousin, with an extra ability: dpkg also
performs basic configurations. For example, when you install Postfix,
dpkg will ask you for some basic system
information, install startup files and configuration files, and fire
it up.

Debian
has three different releases: Stable, Testing, and Unstable. (There
is also a fourth release for the adventurous, Experimental.) These
are also known as
Woody,
Sarge, and
Sid. Woody is extremely
conservative. Packages are accepted into Woody only after extensive
dependency testing and security patching. Sarge and Sid contain
newer, less-tested releases. Security patches are swift for Woody and
erratic for Sarge and Sid.

Which release should you use? The obvious choice is Woody (Stable).
It's rock-solid. However, this stability comes at a
price: programs in Woody are months, sometimes years behind the
latest releases. Woody is great for servers. For desktops and
workstations, Sarge (Testing) and Sid (Unstable) are more up-to-date.
And despite the scary
names"Testing" and
"Unstable"they perform just
fine.

As cute as the code names are, they shouldn't be
used in configuration files. Unstable will always be Sid, but Woody
and Sarge will not always be associated with Stable and
Testingsomeday the current Testing release, Sarge, will be
promoted to Stable, and the current Woody will be retired. A
well-maintained Debian system can be continuously upgraded forever
and ever, without ever needing to be completely reinstalled, so you
don't want to goober it up by using release
codenames that will change.

These
are the release codenames, all taken from the movie

Toy
Story :

"Buzz"Buzz Lightyear, the spaceman (1.1)
"Rex"Rex the tyrannosaurus (1.2)
"Bo"Bo Peep (1.3.x)
"Hamm"Hamm, the piggy bank (2.0)
"Slink"Slinky Dog (2.1)
"Potato"Mr. Potato Head (2.2)

And for the 3.x releases:

"Woody"the cowboy (Stable)

"Sarge"the leader of the
Green Plastic Army Men (Testing)

"Sid"the rotten kid who
destroys toys (Unstable)


/ 435